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Archive for February, 2013

Make Your Hiring Manager’s Job Easier

February 22, 2013 Leave a comment

A HR (Human Resources) manager has one of the more complicated jobs in any office environment. The person in this position is often tasked with staffing the office and keeping track of benefits and programs for employees. In large offices, the HR manager may have an assistant or assistants helping him or her with this job, while in smaller businesses this is a one-person job. No matter how big or small the company, the HR Manager can use some help to get the job done right.

Luckily, there are many programs and tools available to a HR Manager that will make the job easier. There are simple programs and spreadsheets that nearly every company can utilize as well as more complex programs that may only apply to the largest firms. One of the most useful tools for an HR Manager is an ATS system. ATS, or applicant tracking system helps automate many of the recruiting tasks that an HR manager has on his or her plate.

What Does an ATS do?

While each of these programs is slightly different, the basic idea is that it collects data about potential employees, either through applicants or data mining efforts and spins it into an easy to read and understand format for the HR Manager.

In many cases, this system can take care of the process from beginning to end. This may mean that the system posts recruitment information and applicants can provide information directly to the system. After a set period of time, the system mines the information and provides it to the HR Manager.

What are the Benefits?

The main benefit for the HR manager is it saves him or her from sorting through endless resumes looking for the couple that may actually be valid candidates. Those candidates who are not qualified will never cause the HR manager any difficulty. This is very important when the HR manager is hiring for several positions at the same time. Without a doubt, it can make a big difference. According to the SearchCIO website, it’s estimated that around half of all medium sized businesses use these tools to streamline the hiring process for HR managers.

As you can see, there are many things that a HR manager needs to do to keep his or her company well-staffed and all employees happy. Utilizing tools, such as an ATS system, is one way to make the process easier and improves the process for everyone involved.

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Is Internal Referral Hiring The Best Way to Find Talent?

February 8, 2013 Leave a comment

referral hiring ATSThere’s a well known saying in the job market; “It’s not what you know, it’s who you,” and in today’s market that has never been more true. More than ever, it’s important for companies to not only keep track of who they hire, but also where they find their candidates. With so many variables involved, external resumes, various job boards, social networks, and referrals, having an effective applicant tracking system in place is vital when it comes to verifying which methods work best for your company.

A recent New York Times article profiled a large employer that receives nearly half of their new hires from employee referrals. According to this and other employers it is these recruits that are the cream that rises to the top of the crop.

But does knowing someone necessarily make a person a good candidate? In many cases it does. John Sullivan, an HR consultant that teaches management at San Francisco State University calls the job board, Monster.com, Monster.ugly and says that it carries a stigma. He also says sending a resume without a connection, preferably someone within the company, is like sending it to a “black hole.” While it does make things more difficult for the long term unemployed, it does bring in higher quality candidates. Those who spend time not using their skills do lose them, and often their network.

When companies do take the risk and hire someone who has been unemployed for an extended period of time, they often pay for it, because the employee may not be as skilled as they believe they are, and may not stay in the position either from their own admittance of their shortcoming, or because the employer recognizes that keeping them employed is no longer cost effective. Hiring a new person not only means paying their salary, but also paying for their training, background checks, and other assessments. In 2007, Training magazine reported that even established employees cost companies an average of $12,000 per year in training. That just increases for new or “rusty” workers. When over 600 CEOs were interviewed by Harvard Business School about hiring midlevel managers, they reported that it normally took more than six months just to break even.

While internal referrals are a good way to go, and do account for about half of new hires. Some hiring segments simply aren’t tracked effectively by most companies, notably contingent workers, such as temporary contract workers and freelancers, are often not tracked at all. While many companies don’t seem to make this a high priority, those who do include these workers as a part of their applicant tracking system find that they represented around 13% with the number expected to grow, Since these workers are hired for more focused tasks, employers are often able to identify a worker’s potential without making the investment of full on training. It also gets workers a chance to meet and network with others for future referral opportunities.

For many companies, internal referrals may be the way to go, however not all companies are the same. To find what works best in your organization it is important to track your own hiring process and evaluate the data specific to you.