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Archive for November, 2013

Is your Business Hiring Diversely?

November 16, 2013 Leave a comment

What makes a company stand out from the rest; diversity? Diversity in the workplace allows businesses the opportunity to approach their ideas from various angles. It broadens the horizon, as so to speak. Different employees, bring different ideas to the table. When the question of diversity in the workplace is put before executive managers, they all agree, that an inclusive workplace with diverse talents and personalities can and do increase, their companies overall performance as a whole.

As diverse and distinct employees are, their talents come together to unify and solidify the business world. The diversified personalities are very much needed at the drawing board. Imagine having a company full of robots with the same mind frame, the same voice and the same way of thinking. When you take this scenario and apply it in the business world, what you have is a company filled with like minded employees, with no vision and no clear direction.

Executive hiring managers are charged with bringing diversity into the workplace. How can they accomplish this? Incorporating strategies in the workplace increases employees’ sensitivity, to others and to themselves.

 

  • By hiring employees with creative and distinctive personalities and backgrounds. Polls were taken and studies were conducted, and the results are in. Bringing inclusion and diversity into the workplace, challenges employees to “think outside the box.”

 

 

  • By initiating a strategic interview. Ordinary interviewing tactics do not reveal the true talents that lie within a person. Asking questions that veers away from ordinary logic is one way to test a prospective employee’s creativity level.

 

Diverse thinking in the workplace is what separates every day ordinary businesses, from successful thriving businesses. After all, where would Nike, Wal-Mart, McDonald’s and fortunate 500 companies be today, if they had not dared to be different? Having diversity in the workplace, exposes everyone in the workplace to different ways of thinking, more opportunities to brainstorm (off the wall) ideas, and the courage to try something completely out of character.

Even in society, diverse is viewed as a valuable resource. When different cultures come together, and combine resources the outcome is tremendous. Imagine having all of those resources under one roof, working together side by side, day after day.

Studies show that inclusive diversity and creativity enhances employee participation. Attitudes are positive, job performance is heightened and leaders are born. Hiring executives are responsible for recruiting and retaining qualified applicants. Compensation often fuels executives to manage inclusion and diversity, but what does to take to make them accounting for finding it?

Management is praised for their work hard, but in order to retain a diverse population of workers, employees must be rewarded for their role in directing the company with their ideas as well.

To comply with all federal diverse hiring regulations and prevent potential fines, also be sure to ensure you are utilizing OFCCP compliance software throughout your hiring process.

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Preparing for the New 2014 OFCCP Regulations

November 11, 2013 Leave a comment

Preparing for the New 2014 OFCCP Regulations

Are you prepared for the new 2014 OFCCP regulations? Learn about “game-changing” VEVRAA & Section 503 regulations effective March 24, 2014.

Hiring Tips: Finding Your Needle in the Haystack

November 1, 2013 Leave a comment

It turns out that job seekers don’t always know what you are looking for in an applicant. While you as a hiring manager may be seeking various people to fill a position, you’re likely finding that only about 1 percent of the applicants are capable of performing the job at the level you require them to.

You can set the bar high by using an applicant tracking system. This means you can enter applicant data into a system and then sift based upon the criteria you are looking for. This can be a lot easier than sorting through hundreds of resumes, only to find that a handful are worth setting up an interview with.

According to a recent article on StaffingIndustry.com, approximately 72 percent of job seekers are confident they know how to present their skills on a resume and in an interview. However, based upon what you are seeing, it is considerably less than this in reality. This means that you need to focus on making sure that job seekers actually know what you are looking for.

Instead of posting a position that says you are looking for a technician or consultant, or administrator, be specific on the skillset that you need. When job seekers and hiring managers close the gap in terms of establishing the skills required for the job, the U.S. job market has the potential of turning around.

Research from the Career Advisory Board at DeVry University shows that the unemployment rate may not be entirely the fault of the economy. It is because of the widening gap between hiring managers and job seekers.

You can close the gap in a variety of ways. When you post a job, take the time to detail what you are looking for. This will ensure applicants can tailor their resume to ensure they are highlighting their skills. You will be able to find the qualified individuals faster because their details will show up in the applicant tracking system. Instead of only finding 15 percent of applicants qualify for a position, you may find closer to 60 percent or higher – and this gives you more of a variety to choose from.

Ultimately, your goal is to reduce turnover. Some turnover is going to be part of the business. When you can find more qualified individuals, they are likely going to stay on the job and they will be more productive during the workweek. You won’t be able to find these individuals until you can accurately define the job requirements for them – and let them know about how high the bar is set for them prior to them applying for any open position that you have within your company.